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Reza Khan – Wind Dance

June 25, 2016

Combining all manner of musical eclecticism from pop, jazz, rock, fusion, and world, Bangladesh-born and raised, New York City-based guitarist and composer Reza Khan is back with his 3rd installment of mind-charging melodies and hooks called Wind Dance, an undertaking that takes music to another level of excitement and wonder.Reza Khan CD

Khan is just not another musician with good artistic vision. His music is an extension of who he is as, by day, he serves as a program manager for the United Nations where he contributes to peace operations and many conflict operations throughout Africa, Asia, and the Middle East. In addition, his humanitarian efforts have led him to various parts of Latin America where he learned firsthand about poverty and human rights abuses. In fact, it was this eye-opening journey that led to his decision to work for the U.N. He also served as a member of a peacekeeping force in Angola. He also lived in South Africa in the late 90s where he married and started his family. To say that this artist has led a truly interesting, awe-inspiring life is truly an understatement. His creative music has only complemented that life.

Khan is joined on this album with some true C-jazz heavyweights, namely trumpeter Rick Braun, saxmen Andy Snitzer and Nelson Rangell (Rangell plays flute here), Acoustic Alchemy guitarist Miles Gilderdale, guitarist Marc Antoine, keyboardist/composer/producer Philippe Saisse, and Pat Metheny bassist Mark Egan. The result is a colorful cornucopia of majestic and artful beauty.

To demonstrate the definitive array of eclecticism shown here, you simply must witness the different textures between such tracks as the telling lead track “Ride” (which starts off moving along like a warm breeze then cranks up to an upbeat display of soulful expression featuring Snitzer’s sax), the pop/jazz/soft rock melodic touch of the title track, the funky grit of “Overdrive,” the tender World feel of “The Other Side,” the jazzy, South America-tinged “Sunset Highway” and “Villa Rosa,” and the very diverse “Bridge of Angels.” The entire album is an expression of individualism in the full sense of the word. So much musical wisdom to be taken from this recording.

If you seek a project that has that paint-with-a-broad-brush approach to jazz, this one should speak to you. — Ronald Jackson